Dr Haslam’s Plagiarization

Below are the many sections that Dr Haslam plagiarized in her ‘Psychological Report on the New Kadampa Tradition’ in addition to those from Dr Lazarus which are included on this page.

See if you can spot the difference between Dr Haslam’s work and that of other people which was published before her report. In total, I have recorded 6 significant sections of text that are directly plagiarized from other works online. In each case there has been no effort by Dr Haslam to encapsulate the text in speech marks or otherwise indicate it hasn’t been written by her.

Whilst it may be possible to ‘accidentally overlook’ one section of plagiarization two or three examples of significant plagiaraization would immediately discredit the publication and its author. To find 6 examples which range from 50 words to almost 200 words, often copied word for word, is clearly intentional.

If Dr Haslam knowingly lied to readers by passing off someone else’s words as her own what other aspects of the report are lies? She has stated her actions are, in her own words, ‘activism’, and that she wants to ‘liberate’ people from the organization.

As stated before I find the whole report to be highly unreliable, unethical in many regards, and does nothing to improve the field of psychology. It is a purposefully negative, partisan document designed to inflict damage on the reputation of an organization because they didn’t terminate Dr Haslam’s ex-boyfriend’s work contract.

Hero Narciccist

The hero narcissist is the type of narcissist who is invested in being the savior, the good guy, the fixer, the problem solver. Unlike most narcissists, the hero narcissist doesn’t engage in overtly abusive behavior most of the time. They often appear concerned, compassionate and helpful. They may even covertly create problems just so they can “fix” them and remind everyone how much they are needed. The abuse from these people is subtle, and usually involves creating situations where people are forced to rely on them. Others may even believe that the hero narcissist really IS a hero. It takes careful observation sometimes to realize that their motivations are actually all about themselves, not the greater good or the well-being of others. Ironically, often the only time you will see overt abuse from these people is when they are not permitted to help. If they cannot be the savior, they are being denied their opportunity to shine.

Dr Michelle Haslam

The Hero Narcissist is the type of narcissist who is invested in being the hero. The savior, the good guy, the fixer, the problem solver. Unlike most narcissists, the hero narcissist doesn’t engage in overtly abusive behavior most of the time. They often appear concerned, compassionate and helpful.

[2.5 paragraphs later]

They may even covertly create problems just so they can “fix” them and remind everyone how much they are needed. The abuse from these people is subtle, and usually involves creating situations where people are forced to rely on them or feel guilty not involving them. Others may even believe that the hero narcissist really IS a hero. It takes careful observation sometimes to realize that their motivations are actually all about themselves, not the greater good or the well-being of other people. Ironically, often the only time you will see overt abuse from these people is when they are not permitted to help. If they cannot be the savior, they are being denied their opportunity to shine and they don’t like that at all.

The Little Shaman – ‘Recognizing the ‘Hero’ Narcissist’

Tibetan Lamas

many Tibetan lamas also see these visualized figures not just as mere symbols or archetypes. Despite being ‘empty of inherent existence’, they are regarded as possessing both an agency that was independent of the practitioner and the power to intervene in human affairs by granting blessings and answering prayers.

Dr Michelle Haslam

For the Tibetan lamas who taught me this practice, these visualized figures were not understood as mere symbols or archetypes. Despite being “empty of inherent existence,” they were regarded as possessing both an agency that was independent of mine as well as the power to intervene in human affairs by granting blessings and answering prayers.

Stephen Batchelor – Dropping the Bodhisattva Gods

Reincarnation

Tibetan Buddhism claims to resolve the conflict between the Buddhist belief in ‘no-self’and the necessity for some ‘karmic DNA’ to drive the reincarnation process. Tibetan Buddhists believe that very high lamas have gained control over the ‘rebirth process’, and are reincarnating not from karmic compulsion, but rather from the pure motivation to aid living beings to reach enlightenment. In Buddha’s early sermons he apparently refused to answer questions about the afterlife, and advised students to seek ‘direct knowledge’ that leads to ‘self-awakening and unbinding’.

Dr Michelle Haslam

Tibetan Buddhism claims to resolve the conflict between the Buddhist belief in “no-self” and the necessity for some “karmic DNA” to drive the reincarnation process. Having understood the Tibetan concept of the mechanism for reincarnation, we learn that Tibetan Buddhists believe that very high lamas, the “tulkus,” have gained control over the “rebirth process,” and are reincarnating not from karmic compulsion, but rather from the pure altruistic motivation to aid living beings reach enlightenment. We review some of the Gautama Buddha’s early sermons to establish that he refused to answer questions about the afterlife, and exhorted students to seek “direct knowledge” that leads to “self-awakening and Unbinding.”

American Buddha website

Ignored Children

Children who are ignored or neglected can create a misplaced loyalty towards their parent as a buffer against letting in the reality of the parent’s abuse or emotional absence. The child overcompensates by manufacturing an imaginary closeness with the unavailable parent. The child learns how to be in relationship with an idealised version of the parent.

Dr Michelle Haslam

Children who are ignored or neglected create a misplaced loyalty towards their parent as a buffer against letting in the reality of the parent’s emotional absence.

[1.5 paragraphs later]

Therefore, the child internally overcompensates by manufacturing an imaginary closeness and connection with the emotionally unavailable parent. The child is learning how to be in relationship with an idealized version of the parent.

Alan Robarge – ‘Exploiting Loyalty in Relationships’

Narcissistic abuse

Narcissistic abuse refers to any abuse by a narcissist, particularly emotional abuse in parent-child and adult-to-adult relationships. The term was coined in 1999 by Sam Vaknin as the name of his support group for victims of narcissists.

Dr Michelle Haslam

Narcissistic abuse refers to any abuse by a narcissist, particularly emotional abuse in parent-child and adult-to-adult relationships. The term was coined in 1999 by Sam Vaknin as the name of his support group for victims of narcissists.

Wikipedia – Narcissistic Abuse
As a side note the use of Wikipedia as a source to plagiarize from is very weak. Sam Vaknin, the person who coined the term 'narcissistic abuse' was convicted of three counts of securities fraud in 1995 and subsequently diagnosed with multiple psychiatric disorders. He is not the best source for psychological terminolgy.

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